Essential oils extracted from plants (literally taking the “essence” of the scent and flavor of the plant or herb) have been used for medicinal and wellness purposes for centuries. Sometimes the benefits come from rubbing the oils into the skin but they can also be added to warm baths or misters to inhale for aromatherapy benefits. Depending on the oil, they can be used to ease headaches or muscle pain, help with emotional issues like anxiety and stress. Some oils (such as peppermint, lavender, and lemon) have more than one purpose and can be blended, so we checked out kits that cover the basics. When choosing, make sure these collections include any personal favorites. We also looked for oils that are naturally derived rather than having gone through a chemical process. This ensures they are purer and less diluted, with authentic aromas to create a pleasing scent to ease your aches and pains — or, just to make bath time into a spa ritual.  
According to a review published in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, “at least 90 essential oils can be identified as being recommended for dermatological use, with at least 1,500 combinations.” What gives these oils their skin benefits is their ability to fight against pathogens that are responsible for dermatological infections. Oils can also help to improve inflammatory skin conditions, like dermatitis, eczema and lupus, improve the general appearance of your skin and even aid wound healing. (16)
Improve brain health. Rosemary oil is stimulatory to the central nervous system, and helps to promote clearer thinking. Rosemary has long been valued for its ability to help overcome mental fatigue, and to improve mental clarity and focus. Japanese researchers have recently shown that carnosic acid (one of rosemary’s phytochemicals) has neuroprotective functions in brain cells and may be helpful in the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease.6
Essential oils are used extensively in aromatherapy and various traditional medicines. Due to the numerous health benefits of essential oils, they are increasingly being explored by the scientific community for the treatment of a variety of diseases including cancer, HIV, asthma, bronchitis, heart strokes, and many more. There are more than 90 essential oils, and each has its own health benefits. Most essential oils blend well with other essential oils in terms of function and odor, which allows herbalists to prepare a vast repertoire of aromatic essential oil combinations.
This reason alone makes it important to choose the right diffuser and my advice to reap all of the benefits of essential oils is to stick with a cold-air, nebulizing or ultrasonic diffuser. I DO keep a little plugin diffuser in my car, although that one does heat up, so I know I’m getting the calming benefits of the scents, but I may be losing out on some of the other aromatherapy effects. 
Health benefits: This essential oil protects wounds against becoming septic, relaxes spasms, increases blood & lymph circulation, promotes growth & regeneration of cells, purifies blood, facilitates digestion, and is good for liver. Furthermore, it soothes inflammation and nervous afflictions, while being good for stomach and generally toning up the body.

First, thank you so much for posting these blends! I am so eager to try them. May I ask though – how does the size of your diffuser (and it’s water capacity) matter to the oil amounts in each ‘recipe’? For instance, my daughter has a smaller diffuser than me. Her’s holds a total of 120 ml. Mine on the other hand holds up to 300 ml. I almost never fill it to capacity with water, but it did start me wondering what water amount these blends were based upon.
Young children and the elderly may be more sensitive to essential oils. So you may need to dilute them more. And you should totally avoid some oils, like birch and wintergreen. In even small amounts, those may cause serious problems in kids 6 or younger because they contain a chemical called methyl salicylate. Don’t use essential oils on a baby unless your pediatrician says it’s OK.
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