With neuroprotective effects and cognitive performance boosting abilities, essential oil benefits have helped many people who are suffering from neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and dementia. In a scientific review published in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, researchers found that because essential oils possess powerful antioxidants that work to inhibit free radical scavenging, they help to naturally improve brain function and reduce inflammation.

Dry the plant material. Drying reduces the amount of oil in each plant, but can greatly increase how much essential oil you make per batch. This is because you’ll be able to fit more material into each batch. Drying should be done slowly and away from direct sunlight.[5] Commercially grown plants such as lavender and peppermint may be allowed to dry in the field after cutting for a day or so.
Harvest your plants correctly. Just as you need to research when to harvest plants for best essential oil production, you need to research how to harvest them. Careless handling, harvesting the wrong parts, even harvesting at the wrong time of day can reduce the quantity and quality of the essential oils. For example, you only want to use the flowering tops of the rosemary plant when making rosemary essential oil. Discard or use the rest of the plant some other way.
For pet health. Heavily dilute tea tree with coconut oil and, using a cotton swab, gently clean accumulated gunk in your pet’s ears. Proceed with extreme caution though and never drop essential oils into the ear canal (whether pet or human). Tea tree oil also helps to repel insects. Use a drop of tea tree oil on pet bedding or inside their crates to repel fleas and ticks.

Young children and the elderly may be more sensitive to essential oils. So you may need to dilute them more. And you should totally avoid some oils, like birch and wintergreen. In even small amounts, those may cause serious problems in kids 6 or younger because they contain a chemical called methyl salicylate. Don’t use essential oils on a baby unless your pediatrician says it’s OK.
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